SIERRA NEVADA REGIONAL RESOURCE KIT & PROFILE

SIERRA NEVADA REGIONAL

RESOURCE KIT & PROFILE

What Are Regional Resource Kits?

Regional Resource Kits (RRK) are sets of tools and data created to accelerate the work by regional partners and collaboratives to reduce wildfire hazard and improve the conditions of forested and shrub landscapes. The kits include, among other elements, a database of management-relevant metrics that have been vetted by federal, state, and academic scientists and spatially explicit assessments of current conditions for key resources in the region. The Resource Kit will be revised based on user feedback and updated as new science and technologies are developed. 

To support efficient and effective planning and prioritization, each RRK provides:

A common framework for planning and prioritizing treatment options

Framework For Resilience

A core database of management-relevant metrics that have been vetted by federal, state, and academic scientists

Metric List and Dictionary

Easy public access to explore and download the regional databases

DOWNLOAD DATA

Spatially explicit assessments of current conditions for key resources

VIEW DATA

A decision support tool designed for the needs of the regional planners and collaboratives (available in 2023)

PLANSCAPE

How Do RKK’s Help With The Roadmap to a Million Acres?

The Roadmap to a Million Acres (RMA) outlines how to build capacity and momentum to accomplish the commitment by the USDA-Forest Service (USFS) and the State of California to collectively treat a minimum of 1 million acres annually by 2025.

The RMA is based on a three-tiered strategy:

1. Coordination of state and federal plans, mandates, and initiatives

2. Development of regional capacity to invest in high priority projects

3. Alignment, development, and application of data and tools to prioritize and report on acres treated and the multiple benefits of projects at the local, regional, and state level.

The Regional Resource Kits help support increasing regional capacity and aligning federal and state data and tools, giving partners the data needed to make informed treatment decisions.

Who Created The RRKs?

Development of the RRKs builds on an interagency collaboration that includes:

• USFS Pacific Southwest Research Station (PSW), Region 5 Information Management – Mapping and Remote Sensing (MARS) Team, and the Fire and Resource Assessment Program (CAL FIRE – FRAP)

• Applied research projects funded by the USFS and the California Strategic Growth Council

• The talent of environmentally inclined data scientists from Google.org.

Specific members include:

ACCEL: A joint effort by the Information Management – MARS Team and PSW to increase the pace and scale of treatments by building the essential spatial data and analytical tools to inform management investments. Lead: Patricia Manley

CAL FIRE-FRAP Forest and Range Assessment: A comprehensive report on the status of California’s forest and rangelands. Lead: Tadashi Moody.

The Center for Ecosystem Climate Solutions (CECS): A University of California-led effort to develop consistent, updateable, state-wide data layers that inform climate adaptation and mitigation. Lead: Michael Goulden.

Wildfire Resilience Fellowship: Google.org has partnered with the Natural Resources Agency to “empower California resource managers at the state, regional, and local levels to target, plan, and monitor their vegetation management and wildfire resilience projects.” CNRA Lead: Jessica Morse; Google.org Contact: Sarah Wood

What Are Regional Profiles?

The Regional Profile series is a publicly available resource developed by the Task Force’s Science Advisory Panel. The profiles summarize the socio-ecological context of the region, highlight example current condition assessments from the associated Regional Resource Kit, and presents findings from interviews and surveys about stakeholder priorities and concerns for community and ecosystem resilience.

The Sierra Regional Profile is available here.

Timeline For Remaining Regions

The timeline for developing the regional resource kits and regional profiles for the remaining 3 regions will follow the schedule of regional Task Force meetings.

  • January 2023: Southern California regional resource kit and regional profile 

  • May 2023Central Coast regional resource kit and regional profile 

  • September 2023North Coast regional resource kit and regional profile.



Governor Newsom Signs State Budget Bill

Governor Newsom Signs State Budget Bill


Governor Newsom signed a budget bill this week that provides more than $1.3 billion over the next two years to accelerate forest health and wildfire resilience projects throughout the state. With these new investments, the Newsom Administration has committed more than $2.8 billion to the Governor’s Wildfire and Forest Resilience Action Plan. 

Highlights of theWildfire and Forest Resilience Expenditure Plan include:

  • $472 million for forest health and fire prevention grants
  • $130 million for stewardship of state-owned land
  • $50 million for post-fire reforestation
  • $170 million to state conservancies for forest health projects
  • $70 million for prescribed fire and hand crews
  • $40 million for the Regional Forest and Fire Capacity (RFFC) Program
  • $30 million for workforce development
  • $25 million for assistance to small landowners

RESOURCES



forest workforce

U.S. Economic Development Administration Awards $21.5 Million for CA Workforce Training

forest workforce

U.S. Economic Development Administration Awards $21.5 Million for CA Workforce Training in Forest Health and Fire Safety


Through its proposed CA Resilient Careers in Forestry program, the Foundation for California Community Colleges (FCCC) will partner with employers, educational institutions, and local community-based organizations to build a state-wide infrastructure for training in forest health and fire safety. The 32 winning projects were selected from a pool of 509 applicants.

Learn More

RESOURCES


U.S. Department of Commerce Announces Winners of American Rescue Plan $500 M Good Jobs Challenge to Expand Employment Opportunities

Read the Press Release

giant sequoia tree

Wildfire Resilience Work Helps Save Yosemite Sequoias

Wildfire Resilience Work
Helps Save Yosemite Sequoias

photo credit: New York Times

Fuels Reduction Partnerships Pay Off In Controlling The Washburn Fire

Some of the world’s most iconic trees in one of the world’s most famous forests are safe today thanks in part to resilience treatments funded through CAL FIRE’s Forest Health grant program.

“This project has meant the difference for the community and the grove. I suspect that if Wawona Road was in the state that it was prior to the project, it could be a very different outcome for the Mariposa grove and the community.”

– Garett Dickman, National Park Service Vegetation Ecologist

photo credit: New York Times

Protecting the ancient, majestic giant sequoias in the largest and most popular of Yosemite’s sequoias clusters was an immediate concern for land managers when the Washburn Fire broke out near Mariposa Grove. Fortunately, a partnership that includes the Mariposa County Resource Conservation District, National Park Service and local private landowners had done the important fuels reduction work that reduced the fire’s severity and helped firefighters protect the invaluable trees.

man looking over burn scar in tree stump

Garrett Dickman, a Vegetation Ecologist at Yosemite National Park was on the fire and observed its behavior. Referring to biomass removal treatments along a key road in the park, he said, “Firefighters [were] able to hold the road with minimal prep,” and the fuels reduction was “…proving critical in our ability to protect the community of Wawona.” Dickman pointed out that flame heights were a few inches to a just a few feet in treated areas, compared to flames that were tens to hundreds of feet long elsewhere.

photo credit: New York Times

CAL FIRE Forest Health provides funding to local and regional organizations that coordinate multiple treatment objectives, within landscape scale projects. Objectives include fuel reduction, prescribed fire, reforestation, biomass utilization and pest management. Land may be owned by tribes, private individuals, private companies, and local, state, or federal governments. The Washburn Fire is a good example of the critical impact these projects have in slowing the spread of wildfire, promoting forest health and, in this case, protecting some California’s most iconic natural treasures. 


RESOURCES


CAL FIRE Forest Health

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CAL FIRE Forest Health Grants

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Mariposa County RCD

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Yosemite National Park Fuels Management

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tree starts

Governor Signs State Forest and Wildfire Budget

tree starts

Governor Signs State Forest and Wildfire Budget


On June 30, Governor Newsom signed a state budget that includes an additional $670 million for programs that will provide immediate benefits during the 2022 fire season and help the state prepare for the 2023 fire season. Key investments (Link pending) include $400 million for wildfire resilience projects, $265 million for strategic fuel breaks, and $5 million to expand defensible space inspections. The budget also sets aside an additional $530 million over two years for forest and wildfire resilience programs that will be allocated in the summer pending additional discussions with the legislature.

Learn More

RESOURCES



Mountain

Forest Service Invests $55M in 41 Projects To Improve Outdoor Recreation and Conservation

Mountain

Forest Service Invests $55M in 41 Projects To Improve Outdoor Recreation and Conservation


The USDA Forest Service will invest nearly $55 million in funding from the Great American Outdoors Act (GAOA) to support 41 deferred maintenance projects across California and Hawaii in Fiscal Year 2022.

Read The Full Press Release

RESOURCES


Great American Outdoors Act

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USDA Announces $503 Million to Improve Outdoor Recreation and Conservation on National Forests

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fire trainees

Camp Cinder

fire trainees

Camp Cinder


CAL FIRE’S summer program, Camp Cinder, inspires young women to join the future of the fire service.

In The News

RESOURCES


CAL FIRE’s Camp Cinder Program

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Wildfire action plan

Ready, Set, Go Brochure

Wildfire action plan

Ready, Set, Go Brochure


The new CAL FIRE guide illustrates the importance of creating and maintaining defensible space and hardening homes by retrofitting with ignition-resistance or noncombustible materials to protect against the threat of flying embers, direct flame contact and radiant heat exposure. The guide provides information about the preparations and precautions needed to safely evacuate if the threat of fire exists. These new brochures are the consolidation of past materials and part of the new Wildfire Action Plan that incorporates the Ready, Set, Go campaign. Brochures will be delivered to the CAL FIRE units for distribution during public events, fairs, and community meetings.

See the Brochure

RESOURCES


Wildfire. Are you prepared? 

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Photo of CalFire worker starting a controlled burn

Recent CAL FIRE Grants Total Over $250M For Wildfire and Forest Resilience

Photo of CalFire worker starting a controlled burn

Recent CAL FIRE Grants Total Over $250M For Wildfire and Forest Resilience


Funded projects address threatened communities, forest health, prescribed fire, restoring burned landscapes and more.

June 2, 2022 – CAL FIRE Grant Programs have allocated funds to address crucial needs in a wide range of areas related to wildfire and forest resilience. Together, they represent significant progress towards achieving the goals of California’s Wildfire & Forest Resilience Action Plan.

$118 million in funding was awarded for 144 Wildfire Prevention projects across the state. CAL FIRE’s Wildfire Prevention Grants enable local organizations like fire safe councils, to implement activities that address the hazards of wildfire and reduce wildfire risk to communities. Funded activities include hazardous fuel reduction, wildfire prevention planning, and wildfire prevention education. 

CAL FIRE’s Forest Health Program awarded 22 grants totaling $98.4 million for landscape-scale forest health and prescribed fire projects spanning over 55,000 acres and 14 counties. They also awarded $10 million to the North Coast Resource Partnership (NCRP) for its regional wildfire resilience plan, which was developed with support from the Department of Conservation’s Regional Forest and Fire Capacity Program. 

30 grants totaling $33 million came from CAL FIRE’s Wood Products and Bioenergy Team for business and workforce development projects. Ten workforce grants will help train over 5,000 individuals in prescribed fire, fuels treatment, firefighting, and forestry, and another14 grants will create 120 jobs and utilize 750,000 tons of forest biomass that would otherwise remain in the woods or be burned in open piles. Two projects will expand the State’s native tree seed bank and grow seedlings to assist with reforestation, and six research and development grants will fund novel uses for forest biomass sourced from wildfire mitigation projects. 

CAL FIRE’s Wildfire Resilience Program awarded $9.99 million in block grants to the American Forest Foundation (AFF), Tahoe Truckee Community Foundation, and the California Association of Resource Conservation Districts (CARCD). The grants will support forest improvement projects on approximately 6,000 acres of small non-industrial private forestlands and provide technical assistance to private landowners in13 counties.

RESOURCES


Learn more about the CAL FIRE Grants Program

Learn More

photo of camping tent

Explore California’s Conserved Lands

photo of camping tent

Explore California’s Conserved Lands


December 15, 2021 – Today, the California Natural Resource Agency launched the complete version of CA Nature, a website with a suite of interactive mapping and visualization tools. CA Nature compiles statewide information on biodiversity, access, climate, and conservation in one place to advance our conservation and land management efforts. The website will be updated regularly to track and show progress toward our conservation goals.

Visit CA Nature