CAL FIRE Announces New Vision for The Jackson Demonstration State Forest

CAL FIRE Announces New Vision for The Jackson Demonstration State Forest


Based on discussions with tribal governments and key stakeholders, the new vision will inform an update to the Jackson Management Plan with a renewed focus on climate science, restoration ecology and a new model for tribal co-management. CAL FIRE also announced that timber harvest will resume with a focus on small trees, removing slash piles, permanently protecting large trees, and enhancing protection of culturally sensitive sites.

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Jackson Demonstration State Forest

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Demonstration State Forests

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Jackson Demonstration Forest: A Great Recreation Choice

Man on horseback

Jackson Demonstration Forest: A Great Recreation Choice 


California’s demonstration state forests serve as a living laboratory for how to care for and manage California’s forest lands for multiple benefits—wood products and timber production, recreation, watershed protection, and habitat restoration—given a changing climate and increasingly severe and intense wildfire seasons. The forests provide unique research and demonstration opportunities where environmental scientists, foresters, and other researchers can study the effects of various forest management and restoration techniques that help inform management practices for government, nonprofit and private forestland owners. 

Common activities on state forests include experimental timber harvesting techniques that test the Forest Practice Rules, watershed restoration, mushroom collecting, hunting, firewood gathering, cone collecting for seed, a variety of university research projects, horseback riding, camping, mountain biking, and hiking.

Jackson is the largest of CAL FIRE’s ten demonstration state forests. The area has a long history of logging which began in under private ownership 1862 then evolved into sustainable harvesting after the State’s purchase of the property in 1947. Today, more forest growth occurs each year than is harvested. The most common tree on the forest is coast redwood, but visitors will also find Douglas-fir, grand fir, hemlock, bishop pine, tanoak, alder, madrone and bay myrtle.

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CAL FIRE Demonstration State Forests

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CAL FIRE Jackson Demonstration State Forest

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Forest Service Invests $55M in 41 Projects To Improve Outdoor Recreation and Conservation

Mountain

Forest Service Invests $55M in 41 Projects To Improve Outdoor Recreation and Conservation


The USDA Forest Service will invest nearly $55 million in funding from the Great American Outdoors Act (GAOA) to support 41 deferred maintenance projects across California and Hawaii in Fiscal Year 2022.

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Great American Outdoors Act

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USDA Announces $503 Million to Improve Outdoor Recreation and Conservation on National Forests

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Black Butte: Reducing wildfire risk by saving an iconic landscape

Black Butte: Reducing Wildfire Risk By Saving an Iconic Landscape


Apr 25, 2019: Recently, Pacific Forest Trust partnered with Michigan-California Timber Company (MCTC) and The California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection (CAL FIRE) to permanently conserve MCTC’s 5,006-acre Black Butte Working Forest just outside Weed, California. Here’s a quick overview of why that project fits into all of our work to protect wildlife #habitat, reduce the risk of #wildfire, and keep this iconic land productive and free from the pressures of development.

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photo of rubble from wildfire damage

U.S. Forest Service Identifies California Landscapes at High Wildfire Risk

photo of rubble from wildfire damage

U.S. Forest Service Identifies California Landscapes at High Wildfire Risk


April 20, 2022 – As part of the Forest Service’s strategy for Confronting the Wildfire Crisis, two landscapes within the Stanislaus and Tahoe national forests will receive targeted investments to increase forest resiliency and health through a broad range of treatments. These two forests will collectively receive $28.6 million in 2022 and an additional $52.1 million over the next three years, for a total of $80.7 million. This funding is being appropriated through the Bipartisan Infrastructure Law.

The North Yuba Landscape Resilience area on the Tahoe National Forest and the SERAL (Social and Ecological Resilience Across the Landscape) area on the Stanislaus National Forest are two of 10 landscapes selected nationally to receive this funding. Overall, the 10 landscapes will receive $131 million this year to begin implementing our 10-year strategy for protecting communities and improving resilience in America’s forests.

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Jonathan Groveman

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photo of camping tent

Explore California’s Conserved Lands

photo of camping tent

Explore California’s Conserved Lands


December 15, 2021 – Today, the California Natural Resource Agency launched the complete version of CA Nature, a website with a suite of interactive mapping and visualization tools. CA Nature compiles statewide information on biodiversity, access, climate, and conservation in one place to advance our conservation and land management efforts. The website will be updated regularly to track and show progress toward our conservation goals.

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