SIERRA NEVADA REGIONAL RESOURCE KIT & PROFILE

SIERRA NEVADA REGIONAL

RESOURCE KIT & PROFILE

What Are Regional Resource Kits?

Regional Resource Kits (RRK) are sets of tools and data created to accelerate the work by regional partners and collaboratives to reduce wildfire hazard and improve the conditions of forested and shrub landscapes. The kits include, among other elements, a database of management-relevant metrics that have been vetted by federal, state, and academic scientists and spatially explicit assessments of current conditions for key resources in the region. The Resource Kit will be revised based on user feedback and updated as new science and technologies are developed. 

To support efficient and effective planning and prioritization, each RRK provides:

A common framework for planning and prioritizing treatment options

Framework For Resilience

A core database of management-relevant metrics that have been vetted by federal, state, and academic scientists

Metric List and Dictionary

Easy public access to explore and download the regional databases

DOWNLOAD DATA

Spatially explicit assessments of current conditions for key resources

VIEW DATA

A decision support tool designed for the needs of the regional planners and collaboratives (available in 2023)

PLANSCAPE

How Do RKK’s Help With The Roadmap to a Million Acres?

The Roadmap to a Million Acres (RMA) outlines how to build capacity and momentum to accomplish the commitment by the USDA-Forest Service (USFS) and the State of California to collectively treat a minimum of 1 million acres annually by 2025.

The RMA is based on a three-tiered strategy:

1. Coordination of state and federal plans, mandates, and initiatives

2. Development of regional capacity to invest in high priority projects

3. Alignment, development, and application of data and tools to prioritize and report on acres treated and the multiple benefits of projects at the local, regional, and state level.

The Regional Resource Kits help support increasing regional capacity and aligning federal and state data and tools, giving partners the data needed to make informed treatment decisions.

Who Created The RRKs?

Development of the RRKs builds on an interagency collaboration that includes:

• USFS Pacific Southwest Research Station (PSW), Region 5 Information Management – Mapping and Remote Sensing (MARS) Team, and the Fire and Resource Assessment Program (CAL FIRE – FRAP)

• Applied research projects funded by the USFS and the California Strategic Growth Council

• The talent of environmentally inclined data scientists from Google.org.

Specific members include:

ACCEL: A joint effort by the Information Management – MARS Team and PSW to increase the pace and scale of treatments by building the essential spatial data and analytical tools to inform management investments. Lead: Patricia Manley

CAL FIRE-FRAP Forest and Range Assessment: A comprehensive report on the status of California’s forest and rangelands. Lead: Tadashi Moody.

The Center for Ecosystem Climate Solutions (CECS): A University of California-led effort to develop consistent, updateable, state-wide data layers that inform climate adaptation and mitigation. Lead: Michael Goulden.

Wildfire Resilience Fellowship: Google.org has partnered with the Natural Resources Agency to “empower California resource managers at the state, regional, and local levels to target, plan, and monitor their vegetation management and wildfire resilience projects.” CNRA Lead: Jessica Morse; Google.org Contact: Sarah Wood

What Are Regional Profiles?

The Regional Profile series is a publicly available resource developed by the Task Force’s Science Advisory Panel. The profiles summarize the socio-ecological context of the region, highlight example current condition assessments from the associated Regional Resource Kit, and presents findings from interviews and surveys about stakeholder priorities and concerns for community and ecosystem resilience.

The Sierra Regional Profile is available here.

Timeline For Remaining Regions

The timeline for developing the regional resource kits and regional profiles for the remaining 3 regions will follow the schedule of regional Task Force meetings.

  • January 2023: Southern California regional resource kit and regional profile 

  • May 2023Central Coast regional resource kit and regional profile 

  • September 2023North Coast regional resource kit and regional profile.



Wildfire-Safety Work Completed in South Fork Mokelumne Watershed

Wildfire-Safety Work Completed in South Fork Mokelumne Watershed


One year after the 2015 Butte Fire destroyed nearly 500 residences nearby, CAL FIRE identified the South Fork Mokelumne River watershed as a top priority for fuels reduction in order to protect communities from future wildfires. With the recent completion of the South Fork Mokelumne River Watershed Restoration Project Phase 3, many of those wildfire worries have, fortunately, been doused.

Funded by the Sierra Nevada Conservancy (SNC) in 2019, Phase 3 removed small-diameter trees and ladder fuels on 285 acres of dense, pine-plantation forests managed by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM), completing the project’s goal of restoring roughly 500 acres of forest. Considering the project area borders many neighborhoods and is surrounded by nearby towns, such as Glencoe, Sandy Gulch, Rail Road Flat, and Wilseyville, this strategic work should greatly reduce the threat of wildfire for thousands of Calaveras County residents.

Learn More

RESOURCES


Building Resilience in the Sierra Nevada

Learn

Fostering Forest Stewardships Triple Bottom Line

Learn

Man on horseback

Jackson Demonstration Forest: A Great Recreation Choice

Man on horseback

Jackson Demonstration Forest: A Great Recreation Choice 


California’s demonstration state forests serve as a living laboratory for how to care for and manage California’s forest lands for multiple benefits—wood products and timber production, recreation, watershed protection, and habitat restoration—given a changing climate and increasingly severe and intense wildfire seasons. The forests provide unique research and demonstration opportunities where environmental scientists, foresters, and other researchers can study the effects of various forest management and restoration techniques that help inform management practices for government, nonprofit and private forestland owners. 

Common activities on state forests include experimental timber harvesting techniques that test the Forest Practice Rules, watershed restoration, mushroom collecting, hunting, firewood gathering, cone collecting for seed, a variety of university research projects, horseback riding, camping, mountain biking, and hiking.

Jackson is the largest of CAL FIRE’s ten demonstration state forests. The area has a long history of logging which began in under private ownership 1862 then evolved into sustainable harvesting after the State’s purchase of the property in 1947. Today, more forest growth occurs each year than is harvested. The most common tree on the forest is coast redwood, but visitors will also find Douglas-fir, grand fir, hemlock, bishop pine, tanoak, alder, madrone and bay myrtle.

Read the Article

RESOURCES


CAL FIRE Demonstration State Forests

Learn More

CAL FIRE Jackson Demonstration State Forest

Learn More

forest workforce

U.S. Economic Development Administration Awards $21.5 Million for CA Workforce Training

forest workforce

U.S. Economic Development Administration Awards $21.5 Million for CA Workforce Training in Forest Health and Fire Safety


Through its proposed CA Resilient Careers in Forestry program, the Foundation for California Community Colleges (FCCC) will partner with employers, educational institutions, and local community-based organizations to build a state-wide infrastructure for training in forest health and fire safety. The 32 winning projects were selected from a pool of 509 applicants.

Learn More

RESOURCES


U.S. Department of Commerce Announces Winners of American Rescue Plan $500 M Good Jobs Challenge to Expand Employment Opportunities

Read the Press Release

Cal Fire controlled burn

LA Times Op-Ed: Why Forest Managers Need To Team Up With Indigenous Fire Practitioners

Cal Fire controlled burn

LA Times Op-Ed: Why Forest Managers Need To Team Up With Indigenous Fire Practitioners


Los Angeles Times, July 31, 2022, By Don Hankins, Scott Stephens and Sara A. Clark 

The forests of the Western United States are facing an unprecedented crisis, besieged by wildfires and climate change. There is a precedent for part of the solution, though: intentional burns such as those set by Indigenous peoples.

Read the Article

RESOURCES



Looking down on pine trees

Grant Guidelines Released for the 2022 Regional Forest & Fire Capacity Program

Looking down on pine trees

Grant Guidelines released for the 2022 Regional Forest & Fire Capacity Program


RFFC grants support regional leadership to build local capacity and fund projects that create fire-adapted communities and landscapes by providing ecosystem health, community wildfire preparedness, and fire resilience. The grants funded with these Guidelines utilize the $110 million of General Fund monies appropriated to the DOC for the RFFC Program.

Grant Guidelines

RESOURCES


Regional Forest & Fire Capacity Program

Learn More

bring forest

Administration Announces $1 Billion in Community Wildfire Defense Grants

bring forest

Biden-Harris Administration Announces $1 Billion in Community Wildfire Defense Grants from Bipartisan Infrastructure Law


On July 26, Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack launched a new $1 billion Community Wildfire Defense Grant Program. Under this new, five-year, competitive program funded by the Bipartisan Infrastructure Law individual grants of up to $250,000 will be awarded to create and update community wildfire protection plans or conduct outreach and education, and grants of up to $10 million will be awarded for associated infrastructure and resilience projects. Applications will be available soon. Local and Tribal governments are encouraged to conduct planning exercises to assist their communities with wildfire preparedness, response and adaptation efforts.

Read the Press Release

RESOURCES


Community Wildfire Defense Grant Program

Learn More

Photo of Yuba Forest

High Risk Landscapes To Receive $80.7M in U.S. Forest Service Funding

Photo of Yuba Forest

Two High Wildfire Risk Landscapes To Receive $80.7M in U.S. Forest Service Funding


Targeted investments for first high-risk areas identified in Tahoe and Stanislaus National Forests.

April 20, 2022 – As part of the Forest Service’s strategy for Confronting the Wildfire Crisis, two landscapes within the Stanislaus and Tahoe national forests will receive targeted investments to increase forest resiliency and health through a broad range of treatments. These two forests will collectively receive $28.6 million in 2022 and an additional $52.1 million over the next three years, for a total of $80.7 million. This funding is being appropriated through the Bipartisan Infrastructure Law.

The North Yuba Landscape Resilience area on the Tahoe National Forest and the SERAL (Social and Ecological Resilience Across the Landscape) area on the Stanislaus National Forest are two of 10 landscapes selected nationally to receive this funding. Overall, the 10 landscapes will receive $131 million this year to begin implementing our 10-year strategy for protecting communities and improving resilience in America’s forests.

In addition to state and federal agencies, these two landscape-scale restoration efforts are supported by partnerships with Yosemite Stanislaus Solutions, Tuolumne County, the Tuolumne Band of Me-Wuk, the North Yuba Forest Partnership – which includes Sierra County and the Nisenan of the Nevada City Rancheria – and several others. To find out more about the initial landscape investments, visit WCS Initial Landscape Investments- USDA Forest Service.

 


Tahoe National Forest: 

The 313,000-acre North Yuba Landscape is one of the largest contiguous “unburned” landscapes remaining in the Sierra Nevada Mountains. The North Yuba watershed is also an important water source for residential and agricultural areas surrounding Sacramento. It feeds a reservoir retained by the tallest dam in California, which also provides power to the Sacramento area. Through ecologically based thinning and prescribed fire, the North Yuba Forest Partnership seeks to protect North Yuba communities from the threat of catastrophic wildfire and restore the watershed to a healthier, more resilient state. This landscape is also host to the first two Forest Resilience Bonds, which leverage substantial private sector investment to help fund implementation of this work.

 


Stanislaus National Forest SERAL: 

Within the Stanislaus Landscape a full suite of needed treatments to restore forest resilience at a landscape scale. Named SERAL for Social and Ecological Resilience Across the Landscape, these treatments include mastication, biomass removal, machine piling for burning, hand piling for burning, hand thinning, timber harvest, hazard tree removal, prescribed fire, and fuel break construction and maintenance. Combined, these efforts will reduce hazardous fuels and create a landscape that can better withstand disturbances such as wildfire, insects, disease, and drought conditions, while also protecting local communities, providing for critical species habitat, and supporting forest use and recreational opportunities.

 

 

 

RESOURCES



fire prevention in field

Community Wildfire Preparedness and Mitigation Division

fire prevention in field

Community Wildfire Preparedness and Mitigation Division


The Office of the State Fire Marshal’s Community Wildfire Preparedness and Mitigation Division works with federal, state, and local agencies, Native American tribes, non-profit entities, and other stakeholders to prepare California communities against the devastating effects of wildfire. The various programs within the division allow CAL FIRE to continue to build local and regional capacity, as well as developing, prioritizing, and implementing strategies and projects that create wildfire prepared communities. The tasks involve working with stakeholders on wildfire planning to reduce or eliminate fire hazards and risks, modifying the environment by removing or reducing receptive fuels, conducting fire hazard compliance inspections, and providing education and grant opportunities for wildfire prevention efforts.

Learn More

RESOURCES


California Incident Data and Statistics Program (CalStats)

Learn More

CAL FIRE’S Land Use Planning Program

Learn More

CA Celebrates Launch of Tribal Conservation Corps Program

CA Celebrates Launch of Tribal Conservation Corps Program


Governor Newsom’s proposed 2022-’23 state budget includes $7.2 million in funding for the California Conservation Corps to establish more tribal conservation corps like the one being launched today.

Read The Full Press Release

RESOURCES


Department of Conservation Regional Forest and Fire Capacity Program

Learn More

Santa Monica Mountains Conservancy

Learn More